Dental Implants

What is an implant?

  • Implants are changing the way people live! With implants, people are rediscovering the comfort and confidence to eat, speak, laugh and enjoy life. Dental implants are designed to provide a foundation for replacement teeth that look, feel and function like natural teeth. A patient who has lost teeth regains the ability to eat virtually anything and can smile with confidence. The implants themselves are titanium posts which are placed into the jawbone (upper or lower) where the missing teeth used to be. In addition, the implants can preserve the facial bone structures by preventing the continuation of bone loss after tooth removal.
mplant3
implant4
implant5
implant1

Is implant placement painful?

  • Nearly all implant procedures are performed with local anesthetic in a comfortable dental chair. Following implant placement, most patients experience some mild soreness for a day or so. Over-the-counter pain relievers almost always do the trick. After healing has occurred, implants give the patient the freedom to chew and smile painlessly again. (See patient testimonials section of our website.)

Why does Dr. Camfield utilize a CT scan?

  • Dr. Camfield believes in using the best technology available to insure that his patients have a comfortable and successful long term outcome. In particular for implants, he has found that a dental CT scan is one of the most valuable tools that is available for proper surgical placement and planning of the overall esthetics of the patient’s case. The scan shows a 3-dimensional view of the bone and location of nerves and sinuses. This technology allows Dr. Camfield to view potential implant sites clearly prior to surgery allowing for better treatment planning and shorter less invasive surgeries for the patient. Simplant – http://www.simplant.com/
implant_anatomy1
Simplant

Replacing Several Teeth

If you are missing several teeth, implant supported bridges can replace them. Dental implants will replace both you lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant supported bridges replace teeth without support from adjacent natural teeth. Other common treatments for the loss of several teeth, such as fixed bridges or removable partial dentures, are dependent on support from adjacent teeth.

In addition, because implant-supported bridges will replace some of your tooth roots, the bone is better preserved. With a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, some of the bone that previously surrounded the tooth roots may begin to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, implants are esthetic, functional and comfortable. Gums and bone can recede around a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, leaving a visible defect. Resorbed bone beneath bridges or removable partial dentures can lead to a collapsed, unattractive smile as well as areas for bacteria to gather making it difficult to clean these areas. In addition, removable partial dentures can move around in the mouth and reduce your ability to eat certain foods.

Multiple-lower-implants

If you are missing all or your teeth, an implant-supported full denture can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant supported full bridges or dentures are designed to be long lasting. Implant-supported full bridges and dentures also are more comfortable and stable than conventional dentures, allowing you to retain a more natural biting and chewing capacity. Because implant-supported full bridges and dentures will replace some of you tooth roots, the bone is better preserved. With conventional dentures, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth roots begins to resorb (deteriorate).

Procedure

Bone-atrophy-5(1)First, implants which look like screws or cylinders, are placed into your jaw. Over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors for your artificial teeth. During this time, a temporary teeth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites. Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implants and attach extensions. These small metal post, called abutments, along with various connecting devices that allow multiple crowns to attach to the implants, complete the foundation on which you new teeth will be placed. Your gums will be allowed to heal for a couple of weeks following this procedure.

Depending on the number of implants placed, the connection device that will hold your new teeth can be tightened down on the implant, or it may be clipped to a bar or a round ball anchor to which a denture snaps on and off.

Finally, full bridges, for full dentures supported by a bar, will be created for you by your dentist and attached to your implants or the connecting device. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in you smile and you ability to chew and speak.

five-on-floor